AskDefine | Define parget

Dictionary Definition

parget n : plaster used to coat outer walls and line chimneys [syn: pargeting, pargetting] v : apply ornamental plaster to

User Contributed Dictionary

English

Noun

parget
  1. Gypsum or plaster stone.
  2. Plaster, as for lining the interior of flues, or for stuccowork.
    Quotations
    • 1952: The surface of the parget might be finished either smooth, with a coat of whitewash, or as rough-cast with sand or small stones. — L.F. Salzman, Building in England, p. 191.
  3. Paint, especially for the face. [Obs.]

Verb

parget (pargeted or pargetted, pargeting or pargetting)
  1. To coat with parget; to plaster, as walls, or the interior of flues; as, to parget the outside of their houses.
    Quotations
    • 1952: Closely allied to daubing was pargetting or rough-casting, the chief difference, so far as any real distinction was made in the technical use of the terms, being that in pargetting mortar or a coarse form of plaster was used instead of clay or loam. — L.F. Salzman, Building in England, p. 191.
  2. To paint; to cover over. [Obs.]

Extensive Definition

Pargeting (or sometimes pargetting) is a decorative plastering applied to building walls.
Pargeting derives from the word 'parget', a Middle English term that is probably derived from the Old French 'pargeter' / 'parjeter', to throw about, or 'porgeter', to roughcast a wall. (Source: Webster.) However, the term is more usually applied only to the decoration in relief of the plastering between the studwork on the outside of half-timber houses, or sometimes covering the whole wall. The devices were stamped on the wet plaster. This seems generally to have been done by sticking a number of pins in a board in certain lines or curves, and then pressing on the wet plaster in various directions, so as to form geometrical figures. Sometimes these devices are in relief, and in the time of Elizabeth I of England represent figures, birds and foliages. Fine examples can be seen at Ipswich, Maidstone, Newark-on-Trent.
The term is also applied to the lining of the inside of smoke flues to form an even surface for the passage of the smoke.

External links

Synonyms, Antonyms and Related Words

Privacy Policy, About Us, Terms and Conditions, Contact Us
Permission is granted to copy, distribute and/or modify this document under the terms of the GNU Free Documentation License, Version 1.2
Material from Wikipedia, Wiktionary, Dict
Valid HTML 4.01 Strict, Valid CSS Level 2.1